In Incorporated Village of Lindenhurst v. One World Recycling, LLC, et al., the Second Department reversed the lower court’s denial of permanent injunctive relief, in large part based on the existence of prior agreements between the parties.  The appellant, Incorporated Village of Lindenhurst (the “Village”), sought to prohibit One World Recycling, LLC (“One World”) from exceeding waste processing limits
Continue Reading Prior Agreement Limiting Waste Processing Trumps DEC Renewal Permit

In a recent decision, Matter of Red Wing Properties, Inc. v. Town of Rhinebeck, et al., the Second Department held that a landowner’s intent to continue using its property for mining operations established a valid pre-existing nonconforming use.

Red Wing Properties, Inc. (“Petitioner”) owns roughly 241 acres of property located with the Town of Rhinebeck (the “Town”).  For several
Continue Reading Landowner’s Intent to Mine Property Sufficient to Establish Nonconforming Use

A recent Second Department decision, Matter of Reddock v New York State Dept. of Envtl. Conservation, highlights a unique procedural quirk involving Article 78 proceedings where the challenge is based upon “substantial evidence”.

The petitioners in Reddock own a 2.07-acre parcel of property in the Town of Smithtown adjacent to the Nissequogue River (the “Property”) and within the Nissequogue
Continue Reading Unique Procedural Rule Requires Transfer of Article 78 Proceeding to Appellate Division

After six years and vigorous public comment, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has adopted substantive amendments to the implementing regulations of the State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA). The new regulations take effect on January 1, 2019 and will apply to all pending and future actions for which a determination of significance has not been made
Continue Reading Long-Awaited SEQRA Amendments Are Finally Here: So What Are They, and What Do They Mean?

In April of 2016 we published the blog entitled “Mining in the Hamptons: Appellate Division Affirms Town of Southampton Zoning Board of Appeals Limitations on Pre-existing Nonconforming Uses Associated with Hamptons Mining Operation.” Despite the Appellate Division’s decision regarding certain pre-existing nonconforming uses occurring on the site, Sand Land Corporation’s (“Sandland”) pre-existing mining use of the property was
Continue Reading An Update on Sand Mining in the Hamptons: NYS DEC Procedurally Halts the DEC Processing of Sandland’s Mining Permit

In Fichera, et al. v. New York State Dep’t of Envt’l Conserv., et al., decided last month, Petitioners commenced an Article 78 proceeding seeking to void actions taken and determinations made by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and the Zoning Board of Appeals of the Town of Sterling (“Sterling ZBA”) and to enjoin the
Continue Reading Failure to Refer Area Variance Application to County Planning Agency Poses Jurisdictional Defect and Nullifies Approvals

In 2012, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) proposed sweeping changes to its State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA) regulations. These proposed changes were not adopted. Rather, five years later, in February 2017, the NYSDEC issued proposed amendments to the SEQRA regulations and a draft generic environmental impact statement, (GEIS), in which it set forth its rationale
Continue Reading The Continuing Saga Of NYSDEC’s Proposed Amendments To Its SEQRA Regulations

ewaste photo Want to get rid of that ten-year-old computer or monitor?  Don’t just toss it out with the general trash if you live or work in New York.  New York requires recycling of electronic equipment, known as e-waste. According to a recent report issued by the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, the State’s e-waste recycling program has been an overwhelming success.
Continue Reading New York State Requires Recycling of E-Waste

fp_sea_level_globeImagine walking along Jones Beach, dipping your toes into the cool ocean water. Now imagine that ocean six feet higher. Scientists project that by 2100, sea levels along New York’s coastlines and estuaries likely will be 18 to 50 inches higher than they presently are. One New York State-funded research study predicted that sea levels could be as much as


Continue Reading Regulating Sea-Level Rise In New York