Town of North Hempstead

The Town of North Hempstead decided to ban recreational marijuana even before it becomes legal in New York. At its January 8, 2019 meeting, the Town Board unanimously adopted Local Law 1-2019, amending the Town zoning code, to prohibit the retail sale, distribution or offer of consumption of marijuana in all use districts.

The local law provides that no building, structure or premises approved or used as a medical marijuana dispensary may be used as a marijuana retail store. The local law also provides that no other building, structure or premises within any use district may be used for the sale, distribution or offer for consumption of marijuana or marijuana products in a retail setting or environment for non-medical use.

In a press release following the adoption of the local law, Town Supervisor Judi Bosworth noted that the Town Board members “certainly understand and support the need for medical marijuana dispensaries and their place in alleviating pain and discomfort in patients, we feel that this law prohibiting the sale of recreational marijuana addresses the concerns brought to us by many residents.”

This is not the first time the Town of North Hempstead used its zoning power to enact a local law controlling marijuana within its borders. In December 2018, the Town Board unanimously approved Local Law 12-2018, which restricts the location of medical marijuana dispensaries. Such facilities are prohibited from being located within 1,000 feet of a school, park, child care center or house of worship. These dispensaries also cannot be located within 500 feet of a Town residential district. The local law limits the number of dispensaries in the Town to two.

We shall see if other municipalities decide to use zoning to ban or control marijuana use within their borders. Stayed tuned for more developments.

Following the adoption of a moratorium on development along Port Washington’s waterfront, North Hempstead Town officials have proposed new zoning regulations designed to preserve public access and prevent excess building in Port Washington’s Waterfront Business (“B-W”) District.  The Town’s B-W District encompasses approximately 10 acres adjacent to Manhasset Bay, and runs along the west side of Main Street from Sunset Park to Dolphin Green.  According to North Hempstead Town Code, Article XVIIA, the B-W District was established “to promote, enhance and encourage water-dependent uses and increase opportunities for public access along the Town’s commercial waterfront.”

At a well-attended meeting held on July 25, 2018, at the Port Washington Public Library, Supervisor Judi Bosworth, Councilwoman Dina De Giorgio and Commissioner of Planning Michael  Levine, using PowerPoint slides, presented the Town’s findings made during the moratorium and their ideas and proposals for new zoning regulations in the B-W District.

Commissioner Levine compared the unique character of Port Washington’s waterfront to vibrant waterfront communities on Long Island, such as Port Jefferson, Northport and Greenport, and also Newport, Rhode Island, all of which provided inspiration for the proposed changes.  He then identified the goals and objectives of the new zoning regulations, which include encouraging an appropriate mix of land uses, contextual building design, and the creation of more public access and open space.  The proposed regulations are intended to create a more vibrant and accessible waterfront community, while maintaining the area’s small-town character.

In order to accomplish the stated goals and objectives, the proposed regulations would place additional limits on building height and density to reduce the scale of development and require that new structures be arranged so that Manhasset Bay is both visible from the street and accessible to the public.  This would be accomplished by requiring, among other things, a minimum view corridor of at least 35 feet extending from the front property line to the water’s edge.  A public access corridor of at least 20 feet would also be required along the shoreline that would allow the Town to extend the Bay Walk south to Sunset Park.

While the proposed regulations call for a reduction in the “as of right” height limit and density, they offer incentives for increased height and density to developers who propose smaller buildings, provide additional open space, and incorporate “green” sustainable infrastructure and enhanced architectural design elements into their buildings.  For instance, the 18 dwelling units per acre baseline density for residential buildings in the B-W zone may be increased up to 36 dwelling units per acre based on a numerical scoring system that rewards developments that maximize open space and public access and are designed with desirable architectural elements.

In addition to changes to the bulk and area requirements of the zone, certain developments proposed in the B-W District would be subject to an amended review process under the new regulations.  New development on properties larger than 25,000 square feet would be subject to site plan approval by the North Hempstead Town Board, which would review the layout of the building on the site and the adequacy of landscaping, lighting and building design.  Developments which propose a residential component would also require a special use permit from the Town Board.

According to Town officials, the Town Board intends to hold a public hearing to consider the adoption of new regulations for the B-W District in the fall, prior to the expiration of the moratorium in November 2018.

Questions regarding zoning regulations in Port Washington or the Town of North Hempstead?  Please contact me at aguardino@farrellfritz.com.

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Several Long Island municipalities have local laws that peg the issuance of certain building permits to a requirement that contractors and subcontractors be participants in a “qualified apprenticeship program” that is registered and approved by the New York State Department of Labor. While these provisions are often entitled “safe and code compliant construction” and may be perceived as fostering apprenticeship programs for building construction trades, many contractors on Long Island disagree.

They see these provisions as having nothing to do with safety or compliance. They point out that many of these codes do not require that apprentices work on the project or that the selected contractor even employ such apprentices. Rather, all that is required is that the contractor have a collective bargaining agreement with a union that has a qualified apprenticeship program. They contend that these code provisions are aimed at ensuring that contractors affiliated with certain unions get the jobs by prohibiting non-unionized contractors or unionized contractors with affiliated unions that do not meet the qualified apprenticeship program requirement from getting building permits. And they further argue that these provisions add significant costs to the price of construction.

A recent decision by a federal judge may be changing that. But first, a sampling of codes provisions on Long Island that require qualified apprenticeship programs for building permits.

Town of Huntington

Section 87-55.1 of the Huntington Town Code provides that prior to the issuance of “building permits for the construction of commercial buildings of at least one hundred thousand (100,000) square feet,” applicants must “demonstrate that any general contractor, contractor or subcontractor for such project, must have apprenticeship agreements appropriate for the type and scope of work to be performed, which have been registered with, and approved by, the New York State Commissioner of Labor in accordance with Article 23 of the New York Labor Law.”

Town of Brookhaven

Section 16-3.1 of the Brookhaven Town Code requires that prior to the issuance of  “foundation permits and building permits for the construction of a building located in commercial and industrial zoning districts where the square footage of the footprint is 100,000 square feet or greater” and prior to the issuance of building permits for “an addition to an existing building located in commercial and industrial zoning districts when such addition is 100,000 square feet or greater,” that the applicant “demonstrate that any general contractor, contractor or subcontractor for such project participates in an approved apprenticeship training program(s) appropriate for the type and scope of work to be performed, that has been registered with, and approved by, the New York State Department of Labor in accordance with Article 23 of the New York Labor Law.”

Under Brookhaven’s code provision, unless an existing building has a certificate of occupancy or its equivalent, the square footage of the existing building is included in the calculation of the 100,000 square foot threshold.

Town of North Hempstead

Section 24-68 of the North Hempstead Town Code provides the following. “Every contractor or subcontractor who is a party to, or working under, a construction contract with the Town shall be a participant in good standing in a qualified apprenticeship program that is registered with and approved by the DOL and shall have in place apprenticeship agreements that specifically identify or pertain to the trade(s) and/or job title(s) called for within the construction contract.”

Section 2-9.1 of the North Hempstead Code requires that prior to issuance of a building permit for a “large commercial project,” the applicant must demonstrate that “any general contractor, contractor or subcontractor for such project is a participant in good standing in a qualified apprenticeship program that is registered with and approved by the DOL and has apprenticeship agreements, which are specifically identified as pertaining to the trade(s) and/or job title(s) called for by such project.”

A “large commercial project” is defined as “[t]he erection, construction, enlargement, alteration, removal, improvement, renovation, demolition or conversion of a commercial building or structure where such erection, construction, enlargement, alteration, removal, improvement, renovation, demolition or conversion involves an area of 100,000 square feet or more of floor area. The threshold of 100,000 square feet may be met either in a single building or a collection of buildings located on the same property.”

City of Long Beach

Section 7-48 of the City of Long Beach Code of Ordinances covers apprenticeship requirements. It provides that “as a condition precedent for, the issuance of all building permits…for construction of buildings of at least 100,000 square feet…any contractor or subcontractor, who is a party to, or working under, a construction contract, [must] be a participant in good standing of a qualified apprenticeship program that is registered with and approved by the New York State Department of Labor and to have apprenticeship agreements…which have been registered with, and approved by, the New York State Commissioner of Labor in accordance with Article 23 of the New York Labor Law.”

Town of Oyster Bay

Section 93-16.3 of the Town of Oyster Bay Town Code requires that any contractor or subcontractor who is performing construction on any “structures used for purposes other than private one- or two-family residences, and shall include, without limitation, buildings used for offices, retail or wholesale stores, warehouses, schools, and public buildings” shall “be a participant in good standing of a qualified apprenticeship program that is registered with and approved by the New York State Department of Labor and to have apprenticeship agreements, as evidenced by valid D.O.L. certificates of completion which are specifically identified as pertaining to the trade(s) and/or job title(s) necessary for said construction project.”

Sections 93-16.1 and 93-16.2 apply this provision to buildings of 100,000 square feet or more, and have other refinements to that 100,000 square foot threshold.

 Legal Challenge to Oyster Bay Provision

A legal challenge to Oyster Bay’s provisions is pending in the federal court in Central Islip. That case is entitled Hartcorn Plumbing and Heating, Inc. v Town of Oyster Bay.  Plaintiffs contend that Oyster Bay’s code is unconstitutional as it applies not just to contracts that the Town is a party to or funds, but also applies to wholly private contracts.

On February 7, 2018, Judge Hurley issued a preliminary injunction, enjoining the Town of Oyster Bay from enforcing Town Code 93-16.3, with respect to any contract that the Town of Oyster Bay is not a “direct or indirect party.” As a result, at least for now, projects that do not involve the Town of Oyster Bay as a party to the contract or are not funded by the town can get building permits without demonstrating that their contractors participate in “qualified apprenticeship programs.” Whether that ruling is ultimately upheld as the case proceeds is unknown, but it may result in other municipalities reexamining their code provisions voluntarily or as a result of similar court challenges.

hour-glassUnder New York State law, zoning boards and planning boards are authorized to impose reasonable and appropriate conditions  and restrictions on the grant of a variance or special permit, provided that they are directly related to, and incidental to, the proposed use of the property.  Such conditions shall be consistent with the spirit and intent of the zoning ordinance and shall be imposed for the purpose of minimizing any adverse impact such variance or special permit may have on the neighborhood community.  As a further limitation on the imposition of conditions, said conditions must also be authorized by the zoning ordinance.

In Matter of Ronald Citrin v. Board of Zoning and Appeals of Town of North Hempstead, 2016 NY Slip Op 06827 (2d Dept., October 19, 2016), the Town of North Hempstead Zoning Board of Appeals granted Petitioners’ application, brought pursuant to Town Code § 70-225(E), for a special permit.  The special permit sought to continue the use of a parking lot that was located adjacent to its restaurant and extended into the residentially-zoned portion of the Petitioner’s split-zoned lot.  The Zoning Board granted the Petitioner’s application to continue the use of the parking lot in the residence district, but imposed a five-year durational limit on the grant.

The Petitioners commenced a CPLR Article 78 proceeding, seeking to annul the five-year durational limit. After the Supreme Court denied the petition and dismissed the proceeding, the Appellate Division, Second Department, reversed and annulled the portion of the Zoning Board determination that imposed the five-year duration limit.  The appellate court found that the Zoning Board did not have the authority to impose a duration limit on the special permit because Town Code § 70-225(E) does not explicitly provide the Board with the authority to impose durational limits upon permits granted pursuant to that section.  Accordingly, it was improper for the Board to include a five-year durational limit on a special permit granted pursuant to that provision.

front yardWhile the answer to the question posed in the title to this article seems obvious enough, it is actually a fairly complex question in many jurisdictions on Long Island.  It is important to know where the front yard for your property is because municipalities typically regulate the location and types of structures that can be placed in front yards, more so than in rear and side yards.

Generally, a front yard is defined as an open, unoccupied space on the same lot with a building, situated between the nearest roof or foundation portion of the principal building and the lot line adajcent to a street, and extending from side lot line to side lot line in the case of interior lots.  Questions about the location of a front yard most often arise when a property is located on a corner lot, flag lot or waterfront lot.

For instance, the Town of Southampton has stated that corner lots shall have two front yards situated between the nearest roofed portion of the principal building and the front lot line along each street.  This can result in larger setbacks, depending on the regulations of the zoning district in which the lot is located, than would normally be required for what is a side yard on a non-corner lot.  Other municipalities, such as the Town of North Hempstead, require that corner lots have a front yard on each street frontage, however, the front yard setbacks are determined based on the width of the two street frontages with the narrower street frontage requiring a greater setback.

For properties which are located on the water, municipalities often consider the waterfront boundary to be the lot’s primary frontage.  For instance, in the Town of Southampton, a waterfront lot line is deemed to be the front lot line and the line opposite the front lot line being the rear lot line. This can result in swimming pools or other typical “rear yard” accessory structures being placed in what is generally thought of as the “front yard.”

This issue recently arose in the Town of Southampton, following the Town building department’s determination that a property having wetlands in the rear of the residence was a waterfront parcel, thereby making the yard facing the water the lot’s “front yard.”  Based on this determination, the homeowner was issued a building permit to allow for a swimming pool, which is only allowed in a rear yard, to be constructed in the yard facing the street.  The neighbors challenged the building department’s determination before the Town’s Zoning Board of Appeals, and the Zoning Board ruled that the existence of wetlands did not make the lot a “waterfront” parcel and overturned the building inspector’s determination.

As you can see, depending on the jurisdiction and the location of the building lot, the yard in the front of a residence may be a lot’s front yard for practical purposes, but not for zoning purposes.  Accordingly, when any construction or renovations are planned for a property, the property owner or contractor should look very carefully as to what the various setback requirements are, and determine if the area in front of the residence is the lot’s legal front yard.