Village of Lindenhurst

According to the American Planning Association, a “floating zone” is a zoning district that “delineates conditions” rather than the more traditional use classifications that are typically found on zoning maps. While a floating zone is contained in a zoning code, it is only added to the zoning map after a project seeking that designation is approved. Thus, it “floats” in the zoning code until it is used for a particular project.

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Lindenhurst’s Downtown Redevelopment District Floating Zone

The Village of Lindenhurst Board of Trustees approved a new local law at its June 6, 2017 meeting that creates a Downtown Redevelopment District Floating Zone. The purpose of this Floating Zone is to use Smart Growth principles to encourage development of the downtown area. The Village Trustees believe this new zone will foster mixed-use redevelopment, including pleasant and attractive residential developments within walking distance of the Lindenhurst Long Island Rail Road station and the central business district.

The Process

The local law contains a two-step process for changing a site to the Floating Zone designation. First, a conceptual development plan and reclassification of specific parcels will need to be approved by the Board of Trustees. The second step will entail an approval of a detailed site development plan, and subdivision plat, if applicable, by the Board of Trustees.

The change of zone application to a Floating Zone needs to include a statement describing the nature of the project and how it advances the purpose of the Floating Zone. It also needs to describe adjoining and surrounding properties, the availability of community facilities and utilities, and anticipated traffic generation. The applicant also has to discuss open spaces proposed for the development.

The conceptual development plan needs to be drawn to scale and indicate the approximate location and conceptual design of all buildings, parking areas and access drives. It also needs to show the neighboring streets and properties and include the names of the owners of property located within 200 feet of the site. A traffic study can be requested by the Board of Trustees.

The local law provides that if the Board of Trustees entertains an application to change zoning to the Floating Zone, it will hold a public hearing. The local law also provides that if the Board of Trustees decides not to entertain such an application, it can do so with or without a public hearing and with or without SEQRA review.

The Criteria 

The local law provides criteria for the Board of Trustees to consider for Floating Zone applications. These include: (1) the location of the proposed development and its proximity to the railroad station and central business district; (2) minimum site size, dimensions and topography; (3) ownership of the parcels; (4) permitted uses; (5) height of structures, which is limited to 53 feet; (6) maximum density, which is limited to 37 units per acre; (7) maximum occupancy for residential units, which is set at two for studio units and the number of bedrooms plus two for all other units; (8) minimum floor area of any residential unit, which is set at 580 square feet; (9) minimum building setbacks, which are set at  ten feet for front and rear yards, side yard setbacks are ten feet for one side yard and twenty feet total for side yards; (10) parking minimums for retail and office use is one space per 250 square feet; multi-family residential use is based on the types of units – studios require 1.15 parking spots per unit, one-bedroom units require 1.30 spots per unit, two-bedroom units require 1.75 spots per unit and three or more bedroom units require 2.0 spots per unit; (11) basements and cellars are not allowed to be used for living, sleeping or habitable space; and (12) each building must have security and fire alarms.

It will be interesting to see if this new zoning classification helps Lindenhurst revitalize its downtown.