shutterstock_1842816On April 27, 2017, the Town Board of the Town of Brookhaven approved a change of zone for Rock Hill Golf and Country Club from a one-acre residential lot zone to the Golf Course District.  Manorville’s Rock Hill is the first private course to join the Town’s newly created Golf Course District.

The district is designed to protect and preserve Long Island’s golf courses amidst rapid redevelopment.  The open spaces, vistas, greenery and outdoor recreation have recently experienced a surge of transition into multi-family dwellings and housing complexes.  The new zone removes some of the allure for such transitions and provides golf course owners and operators with more tools to be successful, including added permitted uses and on-site functionality.

Rock Hill joins Mill Pond and Rolling Oaks in the Golf Course District.

This month, U.S.-based energy giant Invenergy expects to break ground on New York’s second largest solar farm project at the former Tallgrass golf course in Shoreham.  A leader in wind and solar development, energy storage and natural gas operations, Invenergy will add the Shoreham Solar Commons to its portfolio.

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The Long Island Power Authority approved the solar array in 2016 and, in early 2017, the New York State Comptroller and Attorney General green-lit the project.  Last month, Invenergy finalized its acquisition of the Tallgrass property.  Invenergy awaits the Town of Brookhaven’s issuance of the building permit for the project.

The 150-acre array will generate 24.9 megawatts (50,000 megawatt hours per year) – enough to power approximately 4,500 homes – under a 20-year power-purchase agreement with LIPA.  Notably, the 24.9 megawatts comes in just under the 25 megawatt threshold that would have triggered a more extensive review process under New York’s Power Act of 2011 that was signed into law by Governor Cuomo on August 4, 2011 (codified in Article 10 of the New York Public Service Law).

Unlike many other solar farms proposed on Long Island and elsewhere, Shoreham Solar Commons will not require clearcutting trees.  Tallgrass was fittingly a “links style” golf course, a more traditional style course hosting open spaces, high grass and bunkers rather than trees and brush.  In addition, Invenergy has pledged to plant 2,000 evergreen trees to buffer the array.

Invenergy will employ upwards of 100 people during construction over the next year, but there are no plans for full-time jobs after the array is built.  The Commons will pay approximately $670,000 per year to its local taxing districts – almost ten times more than the taxes paid by Tallgrass.  The tax figure will increase prospectively.

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The Town of Brookhaven has engaged in efforts to preserve Long Island’s links and, last month, took the first steps towards fulfilling its endeavor. On March 2, 2017, the Brookhaven Town Board unanimously adopted two resolutions rezoning Mill Pond and Rolling Oaks golf courses, respectively, from a residential district to the newly created golf course district. See, p. 2, 151-161.  Recent closure and redevelopment of renowned eighteen-rounders, including the Links at Shirley and Tall Grass, precipitated the Town’s concern and concerted efforts to act.

A housing development replaced the Links at Shirley after it closed in 2011.  A separate housing development failed to precipitate at Tall Grass several years ago; and over the next few months, the State’s second largest commercial solar farm will consume the bunkers, water hazards and greens in Shoreham. Notably, Commack-based development firm Heatherwood has added housing to its golf course in Manorville and has future plans to add housing to its Centereach club.

Brookhaven’s latest zoning ordinance developments seek to protect and promote our Island’s golf courses, which provide greenery, open spaces, vistas, outdoor activities for our residents and visitors and economic stimulus for the immediate areas. The resolutions placed the two Town-owned properties into the new golf course district – which move accomplishes two major items.

First, the rezone protects the courses by making redevelopment into other residential uses less attractive and adds another hurdle to the redevelopment process. For example, a developer seeking to excise parcels zoned within the golf course district to build housing must not only purchase the parcels from the Town, but must also seek a rezone from the golf course district to a residential or mixed-family district. In seeking a rezone, the developer must obtain Town Board approval. Moreover, if objectants file a protest petition, then a supermajority of the Town Board must approve the rezone. The additional hurdle to redevelopment inevitably creates hesitation for lending prospects, because lenders require certainty to finance such projects.

Second, the new golf course district permits the course operators to make additional improvements to promote their courses and venues. Permitted accessory uses include bars, catering halls, spas, game rooms, health clubs, physical therapy facilities and major restaurants. Such enhancements will allow golf course operators to promote their clubs with added entertainment and event planning.

Brookhaven initially planned to rezone more courses, including privately-owned courses, but the owners’ concerns of the rezone affecting their abilities to borrow funds prompted a pause on this maneuver. There are approximately eight other golf courses located within the Town; two courses operated by the Village of Bellport and the Village of Port Jefferson, respectively, are not affected by the latest rezone.

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Last Wednesday, LIPA unanimously approved Deepwater Wind’s proposal to build the nation’s largest offshore wind farm approximately 30-35 miles off the coast of Montauk, New York.  Construction will include fifteen turbines with a 90 megawatt capacity able to power 50,000 homes.  The turbines will be built out of sight to address vehement public comments against blighted ocean vistas.

IT IS NOT THE FIRST AND IT WILL NOT BE THE LAST

Long Island’s latest offshore wind farm approval is not the first of its kind in the United States.  America’s first offshore wind farm located three miles off the coast of Block Island, Rhode Island, began delivering energy to the Ocean State in December 2016.  Although our neighbor to the north took the inaugural step, New York leads the charge into the future of offshore renewable energy development.  Our coastline boasts some of the world’s strongest offshore winds, and New York State plans to take advantage of these endless oceanic gusts.

The Montauk project is part-and-parcel of a 250-plus square mile area to be developed, with upwards of 200 turbines generating an estimated 2.4 gigawatts to power 1.25 million homes.  New York is studying a 16,740 square-mile area (an area approximately twice the size of New Jersey) stretching from south of Manhattan eastward into the Atlantic, extending out to the break of the continental shelf.  In addition, last month the federal government leased 80,000 acres of land south of Queens County, New York, to international energy giant Statoil for development.  Statoil endeavors to build seventeen miles offshore and provide 800 megawatts of power.  The federal government recently awarded several other offshore leases for development up and down the east coast, from Rhode Island to Virginia.

NOTES FROM BLOCK ISLAND – THE LOCAL IMPACTS OF DEVELOPMENT

Deepwater Wind’s Block Island project boosted the local economy and showcases many benefits of clean, renewable energy development.  Five offshore turbines harness wind energy capable of powering 17,000 homes.  This wind energy meets 90% of Block Island’s power needs, and additional energy is sent back to the electricity grid.  The developer (Deepwater Wind) is a locally-based company and is an expanding business in the region.  During construction, the project employed more than 300 local workers over two years, including local contractors.  Many more workers will be employed to maintain, repair and update the farm.  Atlantic Pioneer, the vessel that transported the project’s crews, was built in Rhode Island and will service the Block Island farm for at least twenty years.  Lastly, and most importantly, the farm accomplished the overall goal of harnessing wind energy by producing upwards of 30 megawatts of clean, renewable energy.

WHAT’S ON THE HORIZON

New York City and Long Island consume almost half of New York’s annual electricity usage, and continued development of Long Island’s East End fuels electricity consumption.  In an effort to suffice 50% of the State’s electricity needs with renewable energy by 2030, public and private parties alike are investing tremendously to research and develop additional sites to harness nature’s invisible gift.  To provide for efficient and cost-effective paths to develop offshore wind farms, the State issued a Blue Print for the New York State Offshore Wind Master Plan in September 2016 and anticipates releasing an Offshore Wind Master Plan by the end of 2017.