In People Theatres of N.Y. Inc. v. City of New York, 2017 N.Y. Slip Op. 04385, various owners of adult businesses (“Plaintiffs”) brought separate actions against the City of New York (“City”) based upon First Amendment challenges seeking relief against zoning ordinances that bar adult establishments from operating in, among other areas, all residential districts and most commercial and manufacturing districts (“Ordinance“). The cases were consolidated; and after the trial court’s initial determination, the cases experienced a complex procedural history, having been appealed to the Court of Appeals twice over the course of fifteen (15) years.  A comprehensive discussion of this case and its lengthy history can be found in this extended blog post.

Here, the Ordinance at issue sought to combat negative secondary impacts relating to sexually focused businesses, which impacts were  demonstrated in a 1994 study conducted by the City.  Whether and how the Ordinance applied to particular adult businesses was the impetus for prior litigation in 1995.  In 1998, the City created the so-called 60/40 rule.  Under this rule, any commercial establishment with at least 40% of its customer-accessible floor/cellar area or stock-in-trade used for adult purposes qualified as an “adult establishment” covered by the Ordinance.  Plaintiffs modified their businesses to comply with the 60/40 rule.   The City, however, believed that while many operators were achieving “technical compliance” with the rule, their compliance was a sham. According to the City, the businesses still primarily focused on sexually explicit activities or materials; and their non-explicit materials were an afterthought that did not generate sales.  To shore up enforcement, the City amended the Ordinance in 2001 to effectively eliminate the 60/40 rule (“2001 Amendments”).

The main issue in this case was the relationship between (1) the standard that applies to First Amendment challenges in the context of ordinances affecting adult uses, and (2) the burden of proof a municipality must meet in order to sustain such ordinances. The Court held that “intermediate scrutiny” applies in this type of First Amendment adult use zoning context, which requires that an ordinance be narrowly tailored to the municipality’s justified purpose and assure reasonable alternative avenues of communication.  When applying intermediate scrutiny, a court must balance the interests at stake while assessing a municipality’s factual judgments.  The burden of proof relative to the municipality’s factual judgments is “modest” (no pun intended) and akin to substantial evidence, which is accorded more deference than that given to administrative agencies.

As such, the standard of review in this case is intermediate scrutiny, while the burden of proof is similar to substantial evidence.

 Likewise, the governing legal precedent is set forth in Los Angeles v. Alameda Books, Inc., 535 U.S. 425 (2002), wherein the Supreme Court set forth the three-part burden shifting test, which describes a municipality’s burden of proof to sustain its laws in the face of a First Amendment challenge.   First, the municipality must “fairly support” its rationale for the ordinance. Second, a challenger must cast direct doubt upon the rationale – either by (I) demonstrating the municipality’s evidence does not support the rationale, or (ii) furnishing evidence disputing the municipality’s factual findings. If the challenger cannot cast doubt, then the municipality wins. If the challenger is able to cast doubt, then the third step comes into play; and the burden shifts back to the municipality to supplement the record with evidence renewing support to justify the ordinance.

Here, after applying the Alameda three-prong test, the Court reversed the Appellate Division holding that  the lower court’s mechanical approach was improper and confused the ultimate standard of review (intermediate scrutiny) with the evidentiary burden (similar to substantial evidence) borne by the City. Because the third step of the Alameda analysis obliges a modest burden of proof akin to substantial evidence, it was an error for the lower courts to determine that the City failed to meet its burden.  In this instance, the City met its burden of showing continued focus on sexually explicit activities and materials by the Plaintiffs’ businesses – despite any 60/40 compliance. Therefore, the Appellate Division was reversed and the Ordinance was sustained.

In Matter of Avella v. City of New York, 2017 NY Slip Op 04383 (June 6, 2017), the New York Court of Appeals reviewed a decision by the City of New York approving a proposal by Queens Development Group, LLC (“QDG”) which sought to construct a large-scale retail, restaurant and movie theater complex known as “Willets West,” on the portion of Flushing Meadows Park where Shea Stadium once stood – currently, the parking lot for Citi Field.  The development was part of QDG’s larger redevelopment plan for Willets Point, a blighted area adjacent to Citi Field.  QDG included Willets West in the development proposal under the theory that “the creation of a retail and entertainment center at Willets West w[ould] spur a critical perception change of Willets Point, establishing a sense of place and making it a destination where people want to live, work, and visit.”

After the City approved QDG’s proposal, a state senator, not-for-profit organizations, businesses, taxpayers, and users of Flushing Meadows Park brought an action seeking to enjoin the proposed development.  They claimed that because the Willets West development was located within designated parkland, the public trust doctrine required legislative authorization, which had not been granted.

The Supreme Court, New York County, denied the petition and dismissed the proceeding. The Appellate Division, First Department, unanimously reversed and granted the petition to the extent of declaring that construction of Willets West on City parkland “without the authorization of the state legislature” violated the public trust doctrine, and enjoined further construction.  The Court of Appeals granted QDG leave to appeal and affirmed the Appellate Division’s ruling.

The Court began its analysis by discussing the public trust doctrine from Brooklyn Park Commrs. v. Armstrong, 45 N.Y. 234 (1871) – a decision it issued nearly 150 years ago – where the Court held that, when a municipality has taken land “for the public use as a park,” it must hold that property “in trust for that purpose” and may not convey it without the sanction of the legislature.  The Court also held that the legislature’s authorization to alienate land held in public trust must be “plainly conferred” by its “direct and specific approval.”

Applying these principles, the Court examined whether the State legislature had authorized construction at Willets West, on property that the petitioners contended was City parkland. To address that inquiry, the Court reviewed the legislation the State legislature had enacted in 1961 authorizing the development of a sports stadium on City parkland that came to be known as Shea Stadium. The Court ruled that, since a shopping mall and movie theater were not consistent with typical uses of a stadium, the statute did not authorize the Willets West development.

The Court also considered the legislative history of the statute and ruled that it too demonstrated that the legislature had only authorized the land to be rented for public stadium use, not for private business purposes.

The Court concluded that the legislative authorization to rent the stadium and its grounds to private parties could not “under our longstanding construction of the public trust doctrine, constitute legislative authorization to build a shopping mall or movie theater.”

Interestingly, the Court acknowledged that the remediation of Willets Point was “a laudable goal” and that QDG’s Willets West development would immensely benefit the people of New York City by transforming a blighted area into a new, vibrant community.  Nonetheless, it pointed out that those contentions had no place in its consideration of whether the legislature had granted authorization for the Willets West development on City parkland that was held in the public trust.  Of course, it concluded, the legislature was free to alienate all or part of the parkland for whatever purposes it were to see fit, provided that it does so through direct and specific legislation that expressly authorizes the desired alienation.

While the Court’s ruling does not impact the mixed-use redevelopment proposed for Willets East, QDG is reportedly evaluating its next steps for the project.

The New York State Uniform Fire Prevention and Building Code (“Uniform Code”) sets forth uniform building and fire prevention standards for New York State.  Article 18 of the NYS Executive Law requires municipalities within the State to administer and enforce the Uniform Code within their boundaries. Executive Law §379(3) states, “…no municipality shall have the power to supersede, void, repeal or make more or less restrictive any provisions of this article or of rules or regulations made pursuant to [the Uniform Code].”

However, a municipality may adopt more stringent local standards provided it petitions the NYS Code Council for a determination of whether such local laws or ordinances are reasonably necessary because of special conditions prevailing within the local government and that such standards conform with accepted engineering and fire prevention practices and the purposes of the Uniform Code. Executive Law §383. The adoption of more stringent laws that have successfully petitioned the NYS Code Council are available at https://www.dos.ny.gov/dcea/mrls.html (the majority of which relate to sprinklers or fire prevention codes).

Whether a particular local law or regulation is superseded depends upon whether it is inconsistent or in conflict with provisions of the Uniform Code. Local laws enacted pursuant to other municipal powers for example, under zoning or wetlands protection, are recognized as legitimate areas for government regulation and may also regulate the construction and use of buildings in municipalities.

Not so subtle conflicts between zoning laws and the uniform code exist in many municipalities requiring that these laws be considered and applied together. For the most part, courts reject arguments claiming local laws are preempted by the Uniform Code or invalid based upon a failure of the municipality to appeal the local law to the NYS Code Council. Brockport Sweden Property Owners Ass’n v. Village of Brockport, 81 A.D.3d 1416, 917 N.Y.S.2d 481 (4th Dept. 2011)(rejecting that local law was preempted by Uniform Code); Catskill Regional Off-Track Betting Corp. v. Village of Suffern, 65 A.D.3d 1340, 886 N.Y.S.2d 214 (2d Dept. 2009)(finding OTB failed to establish that Village Code improperly superseded the Uniform Code); People v. Robles, 22 Misc.3d 140 (A), 881 N.Y.S.2d 366 (Sup.Ct. App. Term 2009)(rejecting claim that Uniform Code preempted the City of Glen Cove code on the merits, finding an expressed interest in statewide uniformity rather than an implied statement of preemption); People v. Oceanside Institutional Industries, Inc., 15 Misc. 3d 22, 833 N.Y.S.2d 350 (Sup. Ct. App Term 2007)(finding that Uniform Code and Nassau County Fire Prevention Ordinance can coexist and applying more stringent sections of codes in conflict).

With the advent of Airbnb and like services, short term rental regulation has become a hot topic on the East End. A review of the occupancy standards in local rental codes and the Uniform Code for single family residences provides a noteworthy example of the local municipality/state regulation inconsistency.

Municipalities use the definition of “family” to limit the number of occupants permitted in single family residences and thereby control the use of homes in residential zoning districts. On the East End, Southampton and East Hampton Towns have used the definition of family to limit the number of persons occupying a rental property under their rental codes. See Southampton Town Code Chapter 270 and East Hampton Town Code Chapter 199  limiting the definition of family to include five or less unrelated persons living together (Southampton) or four or less living together as a single housekeeping unit (East Hampton).   Alternatively, both codes allow an unlimited number of persons that are related by blood, marriage, or legal adoption to reside together provided they live as a single housekeeping unit.

In addition to Town regulations addressing and limiting single family residence occupancy, the New York State Property Maintenance Code regulates occupancy by limiting the number of occupants per square foot per bedroom. Specifically, Property Maintenance Code §404.4.1 requires that “every bedroom occupied by one person shall contain at least 70 square feet of floor area, and every bedroom occupied by more than one person shall contain at least 50 square feet of floor area for each occupant thereof.”

The Property Maintenance Code does not define family but only references occupant which is defined as “an individual living or sleeping in a building.” Therefore, even if the group of persons renting a home in Southampton or East Hampton qualify as family and are not limited under the rental code definitions, compliance with the Property Maintenance Code is still required (notably, East Hampton and Southampton eventually codified the same restrictions). This section of the property maintenance code specifically addresses overcrowding issues. To that end, the Property Maintenance Code also prevents a bedroom from being used as the only means of access or egress to another bedroom; each bedroom must have access to a bathroom without passing through another bedroom; and bedrooms must comply with the requirements for light, ventilation, room area, ceiling height, room widths etc.

Other examples of perceived conflicts include occupancy standards set forth for commercial structures and restaurants in the County Health Department Codes, Uniform Code and local laws; third stories or mezzanine laws and restrictions; standards for bedrooms in basements; and new energy codes including LEED, Energy Star or other ratings systems embraced in local laws that could require higher standards than the Uniform Code. Upon adoption of such local laws, petitions to the NYS Code Council for approval are recommended. See 3 N.Y. Zoning Law and Practice §32A:35, State Preemption of Local Laws, Patricia E. Salkin, November 2016 update.

Ultimately, the Uniform Code and local municipal codes must be read and applied together to ensure compliance.

On June 28, 2017, the Appellate Division, Second Department, held that a tenant has standing to challenge the definition of “Family” as set forth in the Freeport Village Code.

In Tomasulo v. Village of Freeport, ___A.D.3d___, the Village commenced a criminal proceeding against non-party property owner, William Goodhue, Jr. (owner), alleging that the tenancy between Tomasulo (tenant) and the owner violated sections 171-1 and 210-3 of the Freeport Village Code. The tenant had resided in a single family home with the owner of the home and two other non-related persons. This arrangement violated the definition of “Family” in the Village Code. As a result of the criminal proceeding, the owner commenced an eviction proceeding against Tomasulo.

In response to the eviction proceeding, Tomasulo commenced an Article 78 proceeding against the Village challenging the constitutionality of the definition of “Family” contained in Village Code sections 171-1 and 210-3.  The trial court converted the Article 78 proceeding to a complaint and granted the Village’s motion for summary judgment holding that Tomasulo lacked standing to seek a declaration as to the “constitutionality of the disputed portions of the Village Code” because Tomasulo had “not been injured or threatened with injury as a result of those provisions . . . and [Tomasulo] failed to adequately allege the existence of a justiciable controversy.”

In reversing the trial court, the Second Department stated that Tomasulo “demonstrated a ‘threatened injury to [his] protected right’ to his tenancy in the owner’s house . . . such that he has adequately shown ‘an interest sufficient to constitute standing to maintain the action.'”

Finding that Tomasulo’s pending eviction proceeding demonstrated a “present, rather than hypothetical, contingent or remote, prejudice to [him] . . . [the Court declared that the] Village did not establish, prima facie, its entitlement to judgment as a matter of law.”

 

According to the American Planning Association, a “floating zone” is a zoning district that “delineates conditions” rather than the more traditional use classifications that are typically found on zoning maps. While a floating zone is contained in a zoning code, it is only added to the zoning map after a project seeking that designation is approved. Thus, it “floats” in the zoning code until it is used for a particular project.

floating

Lindenhurst’s Downtown Redevelopment District Floating Zone

The Village of Lindenhurst Board of Trustees approved a new local law at its June 6, 2017 meeting that creates a Downtown Redevelopment District Floating Zone. The purpose of this Floating Zone is to use Smart Growth principles to encourage development of the downtown area. The Village Trustees believe this new zone will foster mixed-use redevelopment, including pleasant and attractive residential developments within walking distance of the Lindenhurst Long Island Rail Road station and the central business district.

The Process

The local law contains a two-step process for changing a site to the Floating Zone designation. First, a conceptual development plan and reclassification of specific parcels will need to be approved by the Board of Trustees. The second step will entail an approval of a detailed site development plan, and subdivision plat, if applicable, by the Board of Trustees.

The change of zone application to a Floating Zone needs to include a statement describing the nature of the project and how it advances the purpose of the Floating Zone. It also needs to describe adjoining and surrounding properties, the availability of community facilities and utilities, and anticipated traffic generation. The applicant also has to discuss open spaces proposed for the development.

The conceptual development plan needs to be drawn to scale and indicate the approximate location and conceptual design of all buildings, parking areas and access drives. It also needs to show the neighboring streets and properties and include the names of the owners of property located within 200 feet of the site. A traffic study can be requested by the Board of Trustees.

The local law provides that if the Board of Trustees entertains an application to change zoning to the Floating Zone, it will hold a public hearing. The local law also provides that if the Board of Trustees decides not to entertain such an application, it can do so with or without a public hearing and with or without SEQRA review.

The Criteria 

The local law provides criteria for the Board of Trustees to consider for Floating Zone applications. These include: (1) the location of the proposed development and its proximity to the railroad station and central business district; (2) minimum site size, dimensions and topography; (3) ownership of the parcels; (4) permitted uses; (5) height of structures, which is limited to 53 feet; (6) maximum density, which is limited to 37 units per acre; (7) maximum occupancy for residential units, which is set at two for studio units and the number of bedrooms plus two for all other units; (8) minimum floor area of any residential unit, which is set at 580 square feet; (9) minimum building setbacks, which are set at  ten feet for front and rear yards, side yard setbacks are ten feet for one side yard and twenty feet total for side yards; (10) parking minimums for retail and office use is one space per 250 square feet; multi-family residential use is based on the types of units – studios require 1.15 parking spots per unit, one-bedroom units require 1.30 spots per unit, two-bedroom units require 1.75 spots per unit and three or more bedroom units require 2.0 spots per unit; (11) basements and cellars are not allowed to be used for living, sleeping or habitable space; and (12) each building must have security and fire alarms.

It will be interesting to see if this new zoning classification helps Lindenhurst revitalize its downtown.

 

The State liquor law preempts  local municipalities from restricting hours of operation for businesses selling alcoholic beverages for on-premises consumption.   Accordingly, local municipalities should use caution when imposing conditions upon establishments regulated by the State Liquor Authority and would be wise to consider alternative ways to manage late hours accompanied by public imbibing.

shutterstock_542466670In February 2017, the United States District Court for the Western District of New York issued a decision in Obsession Sports Bar & Grill, Inc. v. City of Rochester  (“Obsession“) involving State law preemption of local laws limiting hours of operation for certain businesses such as bars and restaurants.  The federal Obsession case involved section 1983s  claims following successful litigation in State Court. Although the federal Obsession case addressed constitutional claims only,  the decision casted stark attention upon the legal precedent set forth in the underlying State Court case, wherein the Fourth Department upheld the trial court’s holding that the State’s liquor laws preempted the City of Rochester (“City“) from restricting Obsession’s hours of operation.  Id.

In August 2011, Obsession obtained a liquor license from the State Liquor Authority authorizing the retail sale of alcoholic beverages for on-premises consumption of alcoholic beverages at its bar and grill.  Under the State Alcoholic Beverages Control Law (“ABC Law“), as amended by Monroe County local law, persons holding liquor licenses are permitted to sell alcohol, on-premises, Monday through Saturday from 8:00 a.m. until 2:00 a.m. and Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m.  In addition, these establishments may remain open an additional one-half hour to permit customers to consume their beverages, i.e. until 2:30 a.m.

Obsession’s business was located in the City’s C-1 zoning district, which permits small-scale commercial uses and restricts evening hours of operation for restaurants and bars to 11:00 p.m.  Although the City partially granted Obsession’s variance by permitting the establishment to remain open until 12:00 a.m. Monday through Thursday and until 2:00 a.m. on Friday and Saturday, the City’s local laws still forced Obsession  to close several hours earlier than required by the ABC Law, as well as earlier than similar businesses located in neighboring zoning districts.

In November 2012, Obsession commenced a state court Article 78 proceeding against the City alleging that the ABC Law preempted the local ordinance vis-à-vis hours of operations.   The City argued  that the State law did not preempt the ordinance because the ordinance did not directly address the sale or consumption of alcoholic beverages.  The trial court found in favor of Obsession holding that the City’s local ordinance was an impermissible exercise of municipal zoning power and null and void in the face of the ABC Law’s conflicting and preemptive provisions.  The Fourth Department unanimously affirmed; and in 2014, leave to appeal to the Court of Appeals was denied.

Although Obsession may have prevailed in the State court with respect to the pre-emption question,  the federal court ultimately concluded that the City did not violate Obsession’s constitutional rights because Obsession did not show that the City’s actions were arbitrary, conscience-shocking or oppressive in the constitutional sense.  Despite this holding, the Court did note that the City may have been negligent. The Court opined that municipalities could and should consider alternative means to address the potential adverse effects of bars and restaurants that operate in the later evening hours.  To placate opposition to development, redevelopment and applications of the like, municipalities should consider alternative regulations, including but not limited to outdoor seating restrictions, light pollution, kitchen hour limitations and parking limits.

images7PKZX7LEIn this post, which is the second segment of a three-part series, we will highlight the various ways that local governments facing fiscal challenges have turned to imposing fees related to the administration of their zoning, subdivision and other land development ordinances to generate additional revenue.  Such fees are authorized by law and can be justified on the basis that those who derive the benefit from a land use application should bear the cost to review that application, rather than the taxpayers.  However, many municipalities on Long Island are imposing new administrative review fees, or increasing the amount of existing fees, that require applicants to pay amounts that are not reasonably commensurate with the cost of the services performed.  Excessive administrative review fees are subject to legal challenge as an illegal “back-door tax.”

Administrative Review Fees

A local government, as part of its regulatory authority, may establish fees for the payment of the expenses to administer a regulatory program. Pursuant to such authority, governmental entities typically charge fees in connection with applications associated with land development to recoup the costs involved with the review of said applications and associated plans to insure that the proposed work complies with all applicable laws, ordinances and regulations. However, while municipalities are authorized to impose review fees, the courts have made clear that the fee amount that can be charged is limited to that which is “reasonably necessary” to undertake the regulatory review involved. In applying the “reasonably necessary” principle, courts do not require exact congruence between the fees charged and the government’s cost to review an application; but there must be some rational underpinning for the charges levied. In other words, the review fees charged must be commensurate with the actual expense of the application being processed and should not be exacted for revenue-generating purposes or to offset the cost of general governmental functions.

Nassau County’s GML § 239-f Review Fee

In 2015, the Nassau County Legislature adopted Ordinance No. 176-215, which pertains to fees charged by the Nassau County Department of Public Works (“NCDPW”). According to the ordinance, certain fees charged by Nassau County “no longer cover the costs required to administer and process the services for which they are charged.” Therefore, the ordinance states that it is “necessary to fix such fees so that they cover the administrative costs associated with the operation of services of the departments.”

Among the fees imposed by Ordinance No. 176-215 are those charged to review applications for building permits, pursuant to General Municipal Law (“GML”) § 239-f, that are forwarded from the various town, cities and villages. GML § 239-f grants the NCDPW the authority to review applications for building permits for developments having frontage on a Nassau County road, but only insofar as the proposed building, including curb cuts or other means of access, may be related to the County road. Where the application is for a development with an anticipated construction cost of $25,000 or more, the initial review fee is $1,500. However, if the anticipated cost of construction is greater than $250,000, the developer is required to pay a fee equal to .75% of the estimated construction value in addition to the initial review fee.

While there clearly is authority for the NCDPW to charge reasonable administrative review fees to process building permit applications for developments that front on a County road, these fees are vulnerable to legal challenge because the amount of the fees charged, at least for developments costing $250,000 or more, is not commensurate with the cost of the services performed. Nor do they bear any relationship to the development’s impact on County roads or other facilities. To illustrate this point, the fee charged to review a building permit for a 150,000 square foot membership warehouse store (such as a Sam’s Club, Costco, or BJ’s), which is typically a simple concrete block building with inexpensive fixtures and finishes, is likely to be significantly less than the fee charged for a building of the same size and constructed on the same site for use by a retailer that elects to construct its building with better and more expensive materials, fixtures and finishes. Presumably, both retailers’ uses would have the same impact on the adjacent County roads and facilities, but the retailer whose building will cost more to construct will be required to pay more to have its plans reviewed by NCDPW. Aside from being patently unfair (and perhaps illegal), the NCDPW’s review fee structure encourages developers to construct buildings using inferior, less expensive materials.

NCDPW’s building permit review fees, at least when they are based on the cost of construction, appear to be vulnerable to attack because they are not calculated based on the NCDPW’s cost to review an application, or the impact that a proposed development may have on County facilities. Instead, they are based on the amount of the investment that a developer chooses to make in the site. Moreover, according to the Nassau County Legislature’s Review of the Fiscal Year 2017 Budget & Multi-Year Plan, these fees also appear to be imposed for revenue generating purposes and to offset the cost to operate the NCDPW. Indeed, while the NCDPW revenues have generally decreased since 2015, the County’s current budget projects nearly a 300% increase in revenue from GML § 239-f building permit review in 2017.

To date, the NCDPW’s building permit review fees have not been challenged by developers, who instead simply pay the fees and capitalize them into the land value. However, these increased costs are being passed on to consumers who ultimately pay more for housing, goods and services. While these fees are helping Nassau County balance its budget, they are also contributing to the high cost of living that is driving people away at an alarming rate.

In the next and final segment of this series, we will look at real property recording fees, which have increased significantly in Nassau and Suffolk Counties in recent years. These fees are being used as yet another revenue-generating device that some consider to be nothing more than an illegal tax.

 

unanimous-cartoon

Generally, when a majority of the members of a zoning board of appeals (ZBA) either votes in favor of or against an action, the board is considered to have acted.  What if a ZBA is unable to take any kind of majority action, ending up with a tie vote?  The result hinges on the dual jurisdictions many ZBAs enjoy.

All ZBAs are directly given appellate jurisdiction by state law; however, where a local law or ordinance grants a ZBA additional powers, the additional powers are referred to as “original jurisdiction.”  Examples of a ZBA’s original jurisdiction include the power to grant special use permits.

In Tall Trees Construction Corp. v. Zoning Board of Appeals of the Town of Huntington, 97 NY2d 86 [2001], the Court of Appels  determined the effect of repeated tie votes by the Town of Huntington ZBA for variances.  The court held that “when a quorum of the Board is present and participates in a vote on an application, a vote of less than a majority of the Board is deemed a denial.”

This conclusion led the Legislature, in 2002,  to codify an amendment to Town Law § 267-a that added a new subsection entitled “Voting requirements.”  In particular, Town Law 267-a(13)(b) states:

“Default denial of appeal. In exercising its appellate jurisdiction only, if an affirmative vote of a majority of all members of the board is not attained on a motion or resolution to grant a variance or reverse any order, requirement, decision or determination of the enforcement official within the time allowed by subdivision eight of this section, the appeal is denied….” (emphasis added).

So, what happens when a ZBA casts a tie vote in an application for a special use permit?  Nothing, according to the Third Department’s recent decision in Matter of Alper Restaurant Inc. v. Town of Copake Zoning Board  Of Appeals, 2017 NY Slip Op 02871 [3d Dept 2017].  In Alper, the Court affirmed the Supreme Court’s decision that a 2-2 vote issued for a special use permit was a non-action, because there was no majority vote; and the ZBA was exerting its original jurisdiction over the applicant’s special use permit.  This enabled the ZBA to vote again on the same matter and grant it with a 3-2 vote.

Thus, an appeal or variance is considered to be denied by statute if a tie vote is cast when considering a variance. This is not so when the same board is voting on a special use permit.  A tie vote in connection with a special permit results in a non-action.  This begs the question of whether ZBA’s voting multiple times on special use permits is the desired result?

The Town of Babylon’s plan to revitalize the Route 110 corridor in East Farmingdale, NY keeps moving forward. The Town began targeting this area for transformation in 2005. It now looks like the Town may be closer than ever to achieving its goal of redeveloping 100 acres surrounding the intersection of Route 110 and Conklin Street.redevelopment shutterstock_601952789

The targeted area poses challenges to redevelopment. There are height constraints and a runway protection zone associated with Republic Airport. The Route 110-Conklin Street intersection is user unfriendly and unsafe. The automobile-oriented nature of the area, including large parking lots, limited sidewalks, and widely disbursed buildings, is not conducive to pedestrian and bicycle users. In addition, past industrial uses may have left a legacy of contamination.

East Farmingdale Design Charrette

Residents, business owners and other interested parties participated in a multi-day meeting in January and February 2017 with a design team hired by the Town to flesh out ideas and concepts of what the community wants to see in this redevelopment effort. In April 2017, the results of this meeting, referred to as a design charrette, were presented by the design team in a report entitled East Farmingdale Design Charrette.

The lynchpin of the design hinges on re-opening and upgrading the East Farmingdale Long Island Rail Road station, which has been shuttered for almost 30 years. The MTA earmarked $5 million from its capital budget toward this effort. This closed station is adjacent to properties that were part of Republic Airport and are currently owned by the state. The plan calls for these parcels to be the core of a transit-oriented development location. The plan also includes a bus rapid transit  stop that Suffolk County is planning for the Route 110-Conklin Street intersection.

Redevelopment Wish List

The charrette participants came up with a wish list of big ideas. These include walkways, pedestrian crossings, bicycle lanes, and mixed use retail and residential with pocket parks. The residential components would include single family homes, apartments and affordable housing. Other ideas coming out of the charrette were a museum, transit hub, and green space. The design team commented on the desire of many participants for a village-like feel, rather than an urban city vibe, for the redevelopment. The design team also noted that community gathering spaces and cultural facilities are currently missing from the targeted area and should be included in the redevelopment.

The design team drafted a Form-Based Code that will help guide future development. The code, while still a first draft, provides physical details such as height restrictions, distances between buildings, landscape specifications and open space requirements.

Check out the Town of Babylon’s website for more information about this project.

shutterstock_1842816On April 27, 2017, the Town Board of the Town of Brookhaven approved a change of zone for Rock Hill Golf and Country Club from a one-acre residential lot zone to the Golf Course District.  Manorville’s Rock Hill is the first private course to join the Town’s newly created Golf Course District.

The district is designed to protect and preserve Long Island’s golf courses amidst rapid redevelopment.  The open spaces, vistas, greenery and outdoor recreation have recently experienced a surge of transition into multi-family dwellings and housing complexes.  The new zone removes some of the allure for such transitions and provides golf course owners and operators with more tools to be successful, including added permitted uses and on-site functionality.

Rock Hill joins Mill Pond and Rolling Oaks in the Golf Course District.